CONNECT & ADVOCATE

Education and engagement programs support people to get involved in the issues that matter to them, and equip them to become advocates for themselves and for their communities.

COMMUNITY CONNECTION OFFICE

Open Monday & Friday
or by appointment

The Community Connector is here to come alongside people and support them to access the resources, and referrals they need to overcome challenges they’re facing in their lives.

Our Peer Advocate, is present at community meals to welcome community members and help connect them to programs and resources at The Local and beyond.

COMMUNITY CONNECTION TRAINING

new session coming soon

This 8 – 10 week program is designed to help people develop the skills they need to connect with resources in their community and advocate for the supports they or someone they know may need.  The program’s curriculum shaped partly by the interests of the group.  Guest speakers from community organizations are often invited to share valuable insights to current issues and how to navigate support systems.  We learn about effective communication, conflict resolution, and the social determinants of health.

Patsy Day, Turtle Clan, Oneida Nation, guides us through an enriching experience where we learn about Indigenous ways and create beautiful handcrafts together. ⁠

In partnership with Kaswentha/Two Row Now,  The Local CFC is honored to host the 13 Grandmother Moons Learning Circle throughout the year.
⁠Don’t miss out on this wonderful opportunity to connect, learn, and celebrate local Indigenous culture. ⁠
⁠No cost. All nations and ages welcome.
Made possible by the generous support of United Way Perth-Huron and Kaswenta/Two Rows Now.⁠

13 Grandmother Moons

This program is on the Saturday closest to the new moon each month from 10am-noon! ⁠

The Local Community Food Centre acknowledges that the land on which we live, work, and gather, throughout history, has been home to the Haudenosaunee Longhouse peoples, and more recently, the Anishinaabe. The land we inhabit is identified as the Huron Tract in treaty #29 which was signed on July 10, 1827 by the Crown, and recognizes the Anishinaabe people as signatories.

We believe that we are all treaty people and acknowledge there is still much for us to do, as settlers, to honour this treaty and reconcile the injustices perpetuated today.

“There’s so much I’ve learned from different programs. Doing something different. Trying foods I’d never tried because I didn’t know how to cook them or what they tasted like.”

A Community Member • The Local CFC, Stratford